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Naturally Thin–Lasting Weight Loss without Dieting

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Naturally Thin

by Jean Antonello, RN, BSN

Naturally ThinAs both the holiday eating season and 2017 draw to a close, sharing a book on losing weight seems appropriate. So many of us focus on resolutions at this time of year, especially health related issues.

A little personal history: In the late 80’s I read the first book by Jean Antonello, RN, BSN, entitled How to Become Naturally Thin by Eating More. I remember successfully following the principles. Fast forward to a lengthy period during which, due to health problems, my concern was being underweight. Fast forward again to better health, but also to some life changes which resulted in an undesired weight gain. Recently I wanted to lose that weight, and I did lose some with a low carb diet, but then I hit a plateau for well over a month despite adherence to the diet and increased exercise.

In the back of my mind I remembered reading a book about eating, with a blue cover, written by a nurse, but that was not enough information for Google to help me locate it. As a book reviewer for NetGalley, I have an incredible number of books that I can request to review. Almost unbelievably, Jean Antonello’s new book popped up on my screen as I was seeking out answers for the plateau. Immediately I knew this was the same author. Naturally Thin_oldWhile I was waiting for my request to be approved, with names now in hand, I was able to find not only the new book, but also a picture of my original book which is now tucked away in a box in NM while I am in Mexico. I felt like I had just found the Mother Lode!

So what do I think of Jean Antonello’s theories and her revised book about 30 years later? It makes so much sense to my personal situation, and she has backed it up with years of research, working with clients, and eating according to the principles herself. She advocates listening to your body’s signals for hunger and for being full. She calls for eating real food and plenty of it. This is not a diet. You are encouraged to eat good foods and never let yourself get hungry which then results in bingeing. She refers to the season of adaptation a former yo-yo dieter needs to go through as “recovery.” You are in charge of your own eating for a change. The plan is based on the feast and famine physiology of our bodies. Dieting is counterintuitive to your body because when you hold back good food, then your body perceives a famine and does not want to let go of the fat. It also slows down the metabolism to protect us from starvation. Both of these things explain my plateau.

There is so much more theory and research in her book, which is written in a very user friendly style. The approach is not complicated, but it does require commitment, not to hunger as in a diet, but to listening to your body’s signals and not thinking like a dieter any more. Antonello debunks lots of dieting myths such as the blame game that is put on overweight people that they are lazy, have psychological problems, and lack will power. She does not guarantee the fast weight loss most diets promise. She does offer freedom from obsession with food and something that rarely happens with diets—you will eat like a naturally thin person and you will not regain the weight.

Obviously I am impressed with the book. I am going to implement the mindset changes, and I anticipate that this will be a gradual process. Will it work? I don’t know. This blog is primarily about education, books, and Mexico. I only occasionally insert personal posts, but I promise to follow up this one with information on my progress or lack of it. According to Naturally Thin, I can’t put a time table on that because everyone’s body is different. I like that viewpoint, and I like that she recognizes people as individuals.

I would like to extend my thanks to netgalley.com and to Heartland Book Company for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Health, Nonfiction (Adult)

Notes: The Appendix includes a 31-Day Quick Start plan. These are motivational readings that reinforce the principles and help you make the mental changes necessary after years of being subjected to the dieting industry’s mantra of eating less. There is also a Reader’s Guide of questions for each chapter to help you focus on the principles in that chapter and apply them to your situation.

Publication:   July 11, 2017—Heartland Book Company

Memorable Lines: (I probably highlighted half of this book in my efforts to absorb the plan. I have just cited a few portions here.)

When they diet, they force their bodies to quickly burn fat and at the same time create an increased need for fat for the future. This is why dieters always go off their diets—for the necessary restoration of the fat they’ve lost during the diet.

Just like going hungry regularly, eating a lot of poor quality food triggers the body’s survival response. Lousy food doesn’t satisfy the body’s need for nutrients.

…typically people eat too much and all the wrong stuff because they aren’t eating enough of the right stuff—at the right time.

Probably the most challenging aspect of recovery is the patience required for weight loss.

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7 Comments

  1. I decided a long time ago not to worry about my weight.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Joëlle says:

    As you know, I am not an expert in nutrition, only dealing with food intolerance issues. However, there is one thing I would like to point out about feeling “full” and listening to your body: sugar intake, if too high, does not help. The sugar beast inside you will keep you craving for more. I am sure there must be a chapter about it in this book, which sounds full of good sound advice: eating real food is the key! Thank you for the review.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Joëlle, you are so right about those sugar cravings. I have seen that in action for myself over the years. I have learned that doughnuts are just off the table for me, especially in the morning or I will have a blood sugar drop midmorning and then crave sugar all day. We used to have sugar laden Christmas holidays and everyone craved sweets, chips, etc. all week. The author does address sugar and warns against it.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Wendy says:

    So timely. I stopped caring about weight, then started caring again when I first went to my endocrinologist last year. I’ve always struggled with losing weight. This looks like a great alternative to the fads that come out this time every year. Thanks for posting this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Yes, I don’t know what the future holds in that regard for me, but I’m not done with the battle yet. I have not obsessed over food this week, worked on listening to my body and just that has been liberating.

      Liked by 1 person

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