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The Tattooist of Auschwitz–tribute to human resilience and the power of love

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The Tattooist of Auschwitz

by Heather Morris

The Tattooist of AuschwitzWhen a book reads like fiction but is a union of memories and history, it is literary work that is destined to engage and move the reader. The Tattooist of Auschwitz is such a tale, related by Lale Sokolov to Heather Morris over a three year period. It is a horrific story of desperation in the worst of circumstances and of Lale’s confidence that he would survive and marry his beloved fellow sufferer Gita.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz displays the best and worst of mankind. It shows the incredible resilience of the human spirit. Throughout, the reader witnesses people doing whatever it takes to survive as does Lale who is innovative, multilingual, charming, and determined that in the end his tormentors would not get the best of him. There are many books written about the Holocaust. Each addresses the events from a different perspective. This is another valuable contribution, adding to our understanding and reinforcing the sentiment of “never again.”

The Tattooist of Auschwitz2I would like to extend my thanks to netgalley.com and to Bonnier Zaffire for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 5/5

Category: General Fiction (Adult), Historical Fiction

Notes: Despite the nature of the events being retold, the writing has a respectful tone without graphic descriptions of violence or swearing. I highly recommend this book.

Publication:   January 11, 2018—Bonnier Zaffire

Memorable Lines:

Lale has witnessed an unimaginable act. He staggers to his feet, standing on the threshold of hell, an inferno of feelings raging inside him.

How can a race spread out across multiple countries be considered a threat?

“I know it’s a strange thing for me to say, but you will honor them by staying alive, surviving this place and telling the world what happened here.”

He knows they will never grow to be the women they were meant to be. Their futures have been derailed and there will be no getting back on the same track. The visions they once had of themselves, as daughters, sisters, wives and mothers, workers, travelers, and lovers, will forever be tainted by what they’ve witnessed and endured.

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4 Comments

  1. Wendy says:

    Tough subject matter. I remember getting to hear an holocaust survivor speak in High School. Him showing the tattoo, and talking about how hard it was to explain. I’ve never felt so sad over any other act in History than the Holocaust.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      I’m sure that made an unforgettable impact. We need to learn from history so we don’t repeat it, but it seems in our “enlightened” age there are many who are so hateful to other people just because of …. (fill in the blank). Be it political party, religion, ethnicity, it doesn’t matter. We need to be able to have differences but still talk to each other in a respectful way.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I can’t read about events that occur during World War Two.

    Liked by 1 person

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