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Shadow Among Sheaves–sacrifices

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Shadow Among Sheaves

by Naomi Stephens

Shadow Among SheavesThe Biblical story of Naomi and her daughter-in-law Ruth is known and quoted as an example of devotion. Upon the death of her husband and sons, Naomi encourages her daughter-in-laws to return to their home countries, but Ruth says: “Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee, for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God.” (Ruth 1:16).

In Shadow Among the Sheaves author Naomi Stephens uses this story in a new setting. Nell (Lady Hawley) and her daughter-in-law Rene move from India back to England in the glory days of the British Empire. Rene, from the highest caste in India, has promised to take care of Nell, but because of discrimination against Indians, they are treated as outcasts and beggars. Stephens’ story follows the same general lines as the Biblical story but is fleshed out with a deeper plot and extensive character development. Using the complexities of the ethnic divide and the social and class norms in Britain at that time, Stephens weaves a riveting tale of love and conflict.

I would like to extend my thanks to netgalley.com and to Barbour Publishing (Shiloh Run Press) for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Christian, Romance

Notes: You do not have to be familiar with the Bible story of Ruth and Naomi to enjoy this book, but if you would like to read it, the book of Ruth is found in the Old Testament and is only four chapters long.

Publication:   April 1, 2019— Barbour Publishing (Shiloh Run Press)

Memorable Lines:

An aching belly, an empty room, skin pulled tight over hungry bones—all of these sacrifices were worth it, she knew, if it meant staying with Nell, if it meant her family would be her family forever. 

Thomas had never been a monster, exactly, though he had always been monstrously arrogant.

Music began tumbling across the now barren fields. The notes were thick and plucky, sticking to the window like hands pressed up against the glass.


6 Comments

  1. Wendy says:

    “Music began tumbling across the now barren fields. The notes were thick and plucky, sticking to the window like hands pressed up against the glass.” Great line.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. carhicks says:

    Nice review Linda. I waffled about this one, it sounds like I made the wrong decision. The story of Ruth and Naomi is a great one and this sounds like a good adaptation.

    Liked by 1 person

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