education pathways

Home » Book Review » Crazy Brave–memoir of the U.S. Poet Laureate

Crazy Brave–memoir of the U.S. Poet Laureate

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Goodreads

Crazy Brave

by Joy Harjo

When the Poet Laureate of the United States writes a memoir, you can expect it to deviate from the standard timeline format, and Joy Harjo’s Crazy Brave is anything but formulaic. She divides her book into four parts according to compass directions. As a Creek Indian, directions, nature, art, music, and family provide her orientation to life. Each section begins with poetic prose. 

“East is the direction of beginnings.” She begins her tale this way and it is a little difficult to settle into the story as she shares her views from the eyes of a child filled with a mix of fear and adoration.

“North is the direction where the difficult teachers live.” In the second  section, Harjo shares the realities of a brutal and abusive childhood in a time and culture that viewed spousal and child abuse and drunkenness as family problems to be either dealt with or endured within the family. After I read the book, I learned later through a webinar that this section was a very difficult one for Harjo to write. In fact, she got stuck for years on this part of her story with the book taking fourteen years to complete. There is redemption in her story, however, as education offers Harjo, as a teenager, a way out of her circumstances.

“West is the direction of endings.” In this section, Harjo describes her young adulthood as she becomes a teenage mother and finds herself trying to live in poverty, at odds with her mother-in-law, and responsible for a stepchild. What happened to her hopes and dreams for a creative life?

“South is the direction of release.” Probably the most poetic and visionary of the sections, “South” continues Harjo’s fight to survive but also interprets her dreams and visions as short stories and poems. She creates an interesting mix of fiction and nonfiction in her writing featuring monsters, eagles, demons, and ancestors.

Harjo describes her panic attacks as monsters. She labels the instincts   that help guide her decision making as the “knowing.” She refers to her ancestors, those who have passed, as guardians in her life, and she speaks to them through her poetry. This memoir is a mix of what really occurred, her perceptions of those events, and flights of fantasy taken from her dream world; she melds poetry and prose in mind bending impressions. 

Crazy Brave personalizes for me the individual and tribal struggles of Native Americans. Although the abuse tied to alcoholism is difficult to read about, it is an important part of Harjo’s experiences and of understanding  the Native culture that helped shape her voice as an author and artist.

Rating: 4/5

Category: Memoir

Notes: Harjo is currently writing another memoir to continue her story where Crazy Brave left off.

Publication:   July 9, 2012—W.W. Norton & Co.

Memorable Lines:

Because music is a language that lives in the spiritual realms, we can hear it, we can notate it and create it, but we cannot hold it in our hands. Music can help raise a people up or call them to gather for war.

Though I was blurred with fear, I could still hear and feel the knowing. The knowing was my rudder, a shimmer of intelligent light, unerring in the midst of this destructive, terrible, and beautiful life. It is a strand of the divine, a pathway for the ancestors and teachers who love us.

It was in the fires of creativity at the Institute of American Indian Arts that my spirit found a place to heal. I thrived with others who carried family and personal stories similar to my own. I belonged. Mine was no longer a solitary journey.


9 Comments

  1. Carla says:

    This sounds like a very difficult read, especially during these unsettling times. Great review Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Michelle says:

    This sounds very interesting. I enjoy a good memoir from time to time. I’ll have to check this one out.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. This sounds interesting but very difficult…important reality of history however, thanks Linda
    Jenna

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Thank you, Jenna. It is not in my comfort zone as a typical read, but I am glad I read it. Being in a book club has helped me expand my reading horizons. It was a difficult read, but I am a believer in learning history so we don’t repeat it and also in not rewriting history to suit our notions of what is politically correct. If something bad happened, let’s learn from it.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: