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Home » Book Review » Mums and Mayhem–Bellewick’s famous fiddler returns

Mums and Mayhem–Bellewick’s famous fiddler returns

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Mums and Mayhem

by Amanda Flower

Fiona Knox transplanted herself from Tennessee to the east coast of Scotland when she inherited Duncreigan, a very small cottage with its magical garden, from her godfather Ian. She became Keeper of the garden and is learning how to care for it through trial and error. She also owns a floral shop in the little town of Bellewick where she has made a number of friends despite some animosity against her as an American.

In this mystery, world famous fiddler Barley McFee has returned home for a concert, but there are complications to his visit. Fiona’s parents have also come to Scotland for a visit. She plans on pinning them down on the identity of her biological father. Fiona and her sister Isla also want to introduce them to the men in their lives. Complications added into the plot are disputes in Barley’s backup band, a historian who wants access to the magic garden, a businessman who wants to restore a tumbling manor house, a fire at sea, vandalism in the magic garden, and a murder.

With so much going on in the little village, Fiona is stretched to her limits, but her boyfriend, Chief Inspector Neil Craig, her friend Presha, and her Scottish Fold cat, Ivanhoe, are a constant source of support.

Amanda Flower’s Mums and Mayhem is a cozy mystery with a Scottish flair and a sprinkle of magic of the whimsical variety. Fiona is desperate to restore the magical garden and the conclusion not only reveals the murderer and resolves the personal conflicts with her parents, but also shows Fiona regarding the garden in a new light.

I would like to extend my thanks to Netgalley and to Crooked Lane Books for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 4/5

Category: Mystery

Notes: #3 in the Magic Garden Mysteries, but can be read as a standalone allowing the author to fill in any needed background information.

Publication:  July 7, 2020—Crooked Lane Books

Memorable Lines:

The American tendency is more and bigger and better and new. We don’t always buy into that in Scotland. We appreciate old and tradition.

My heart sank. I wanted to grab the words out of the air and shove them back into my mouth. But it was too late for that.

“I think it’s the right thing to do. It feels right, in any case, and when dealing with the garden, I have learned that going with my gut has always been the best choice.”


9 Comments

  1. I like this series and waiting for the next one.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I really like the premise of this series. I just read my first Amanda Flower book a few weeks ago, Assaulted Caramel, and really enjoyed it. She knows how to craft a solid mystery! Really great review, as always.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m not familiar with this author, sounds like a wonderful cozy mystery!

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      It is good. It can be a standalone, but it is not so far in that you might want to consider starting with the first one. I was pleasantly surprised when I read it. It was not like her other series, which I also enjoyed. She is very versatile.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Carla says:

    This is one of Amanda Flowers’ series that I have not tried yet. I like that it is set in Scotland and that the paranormal aspect is not overpowering or evil. I should see if I can find the first one at the library and give it a go. Wonderful review Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Thank you, Carla. It is so different from her Amish series which are not at all like the Brunstetter Amish books–and I like both types. Amanda Flower is not a predictable author. Each series is unique.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Carla says:

        That is for sure, I never know what to expect. The first book I read of hers was The Final Tap
        (Living History Museum #2). It was totally different from her newer books, but I really liked it.

        Liked by 1 person

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