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I’ll Be Seeing You–aging

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I’ll Be Seeing You

by Elizabeth Berg

Aging. A theme as old as the passing of time. Elizabeth Berg addresses it in her memoir I’ll Be Seeing You. She describes the challenges of growing old while trying to help her aging parents as they grow even older. It’s tough. We all know that. And it’s different for everyone. Rather than unhelpful generalizations, Berg shares her very personal story—mostly stressful, often frustrating, and sometimes funny.

Berg’s parents, in their late 80’s, are faced with the need to downsize and move to accommodations that are safer and provide opportunities for a continued happy life, but with more constraints. Her father has Alzheimer’s, and her mother is angry and feels suffocated. Berg and her siblings try to help, to make the transition as easy as possible. In the almost year-long transition process she “learned a lot about them, and just as much about myself.”

Berg is an excellent writer. She explores her own aging, her relationship with her parents, and the couple’s love for each other with sensitivity and honesty. Berg turns a tale of aging, decline, and loss into a page turner that explores confronting the inevitable hurdles in life rather than being victimized by them. Although the most visible theme is aging, love permeates the tale with the kind of affection and devotion that lasts a lifetime.

I would like to extend my thanks to NetGalley and to Random House for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Memoir

Publication: October 27, 2020—Random House

Memorable Lines:

A kind of wild optimism that was in all of us that has eroded as it must with the tired realities of life, with the anvil of aging that has fallen on our parents and will fall on us, too, should we live that long.

I am, as is easy to see, full of hope. But I have to remember something I always forget: you can’t tell anyone else how to experience something. People live behind their own eyes. I’m not the one with the broken arm.

Yes, life is a minefield at any age. Sometimes we feel pretty certain that we know what’s coming. But really, we never do. We just walk on. We have to. If we’re smart, we count our blessings between the darker surprises. And hope for a fair balance.


8 Comments

  1. LA says:

    This is on my TBR….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I worry all the time about aging! I should read this, I like the idea of confronting hurdles rather than being victimized by them~
    Jenna

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Carla says:

    As I get older, I don’t want my children to be faced with these things and I am trying to do tings now. My father died when I was quite young and my mom was gone in her early 70s, so I did not go through what a lot of my friends are now experiencing. This sounds like a very poignant and thought provoking book. I also enjoy her writing and am adding this one to my TBR. Wonderful review Linda.

    Liked by 1 person

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