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The Silver Chair–the rescue of a prince

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The Silver Chair

by C. S. Lewis

Eustace, who became a changed person for the better in C. S. Lewis’ The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, is given another opportunity to visit Narnia. He and Jill, a school friend, escape bullies by slipping through an unlocked gate at the school. Aslan, the Lion, has orchestrated the adventure to send them on a mission to locate the missing Prince Rilian who has been under the spell of a witch for ten years.

They are accompanied by Puddleglum, a Marsh-Wiggle, a delightfully morose character who can always find the potential bad in any situation. Despite his melancholy disposition, he proves to be a loyal, trustworthy, and brave companion. He also provides some levity for the reader during the perilous adventures.

Aslan gives the children four signs to follow. Their intentions are good, but they are not entirely successful. They escape from deceptive, hungry giants and are captured by Earthmen who take them to the Deep Realm in the Underland. When they find Prince Rilian, they have to decide on following his instructions or relying on the signs Aslan has given them.

As in all of The Chronicles of Narnia, The Silver Chair can be enjoyed as a fantasy or with little effort as a tome replete with symbolism. In this allegory, Aslan represents Jesus who is both the Lion and the sacrificial Lamb in the Bible, and the children are his followers. He provides direction and guidance, but his followers still have choices. One outstanding example of the Biblical parallel is when Prince Rilian declare to the children that “Aslan will be our good lord, whether he means us to live or die.” This same sentiment is uttered by Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego in the Old Testament when they are threatened by King Nebuchadnezzar with being thrown into a furnace. They respond “our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery furnace, and he will deliver us out of your hand, O king. But if not, be it known to you, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the golden image that you have set up.” (Daniel 3: 17 & 18 ESV).

The Silver Chair is the fourth book in The Chronicles of Narnia for me. I expected that I would not like any as much as the first, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. To my surprise, I have enjoyed all of them almost equally. Each one is fresh and engaging. The setting and characters overlap, but each adventure has the addition of new characters and stands on its own merits.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Children’s Fiction, Christian

Publication: 1953—Harper Collins

Memorable Lines:

“The bright side of it is,” said Puddleglum, “that if we break our necks getting down the cliff, then we’re safe from being drowned in the river.”

And though you might have expected that the idea of having a good time at Harfang would have made them more cheerful, it really made them more sorry for themselves and more grumpy and snappy with each other and with Puddleglum.

“And the lesson of it all is, your Highness,” said the oldest Dwarf, “that those Northern Witches always mean the same thing, but in every age they have a different plan for getting it.”


2 Comments

  1. Carla says:

    I love your review Linda. I am enjoying your reviews and comments as you work your way through this series.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Thanks, Carla. I’m so glad my book club decided to read the whole series within a different book chosen between each Narnia book. I should have read them long ago, but maybe this was the right time for me. I am enjoying them so much.

      Liked by 1 person

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