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Tomboy Bride: One Woman’s Personal Account of Life in the Mining Camps of the West

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Tomboy Bride

by Harriet Fish Backus

If you ever thought of memoirs as a boring genre, I encourage you to sample Harriet Fish Backus’ Tomboy Bride. It is anything but boring. “Tomboy” refers to the Tomboy Mine, located above Telluride, Colorado, and “bride” is the author Harriet who moved there in 1906 immediately after her wedding at the age of twenty with her mining engineer husband George Backus. The first half of the book describes the difficulties and adventures inherent in living in an almost impossible to reach area with only the barest necessities. Harriet was a city girl and had a big learning curve in basic survival skills in the remote, dangerous, high altitude mining camp—everything from baking at over 11,500 feet to how to wade in long skirts in the snow to an outhouse located quite a distance from the home.

The second half of the book relates a series of moves to various mines along with changes in mining fortunes. Not every mine was successful, and the country’s economic twists affected the mines as well. Their adventures took the couple to Britannia Beach, British Columbia; Elk City, Idaho; and Leadville, Colorado. They had several children and lived through World War I and the Great Depression. George’s mechanical ingenuity landed him a job in Oakland, California, which he held for 37 years, but Harriet’s fondest memories are not the ones of ease in the city, but of struggles, love, and friendship in the mountains.

Mining was a difficult and dangerous business. This was true even for college educated mining engineers who suffered from the cold, long hours and perils along with the miners. Mortality rates were high because of the distance to health care. Transportation was slow and uncomfortable along the treacherous snow packed mountain trails. Water and coal had to be carried by hand from dropping off points up slippery, snow-covered slopes to their homes by the residents. The only fruits and vegetables available were canned and brought up monthly on burros. Because of the isolation, residents tended to work as a community. As long as Harriet and George were together, they were happy despite, and sometimes perhaps because of, their shared hardships.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Memoir, History

Notes: 1. I recommend the 50th anniversary edition of Tomboy Bride because it includes many photographs that bring the story to life.
2. There is a timeline at the end of the book.
3. This is a great book for a book club to read as it is ripe with topics for discussion. Tomboy Bride includes thought provoking questions at the end of the book which our book club found quite helpful.

Publication: 2019—West Margin Press
First publication—1977

Memorable Lines:

On reaching his destination the rider tied the reins to the pommel of the saddle and turned the horse loose. Regardless of the distance, knowing the trails far better than most riders, the horse quietly and surely returned to the nearest stable, at the Tomboy or in Telluride.

Crash! What sounded like pounds of glass breaking into bits was only an old cigar box filled with nails that had fallen from a shelf. Even the rats laid low that night, at least we did not hear them. My chattering teeth kept time to the rattling of the old stovepipe fastened by wires to the rafters. The denim “carpet” rose and fell like ocean billows and wind crackled the newspaper padding.

…at the end of a month we both felt inwardly the call of the wild. Somehow, after the serenity of our mountains, the city seemed tawdry and confusing.


9 Comments

  1. Carla says:

    Wow, this sounds like a very interesting book, Linda. There was so much gold mining going on at that time and it was so difficult. When my husband and I went to Alaska, I was very interested in the early settlers and those who came for the Goldrush. I am glad you enjoyed this one. Wonderful review.

    Liked by 1 person

    • lghiggins says:

      Thanks, Carla. My book club has chosen several memoirs; they are not books I would ordinarily choose, but I have enjoyed them all. We lived in Colorado for a number of years so it holds particular interest for me.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Shalini says:

    Wow Linda interesting. My dad once showed me a coal mine when I was little but we weren’t allowed inside

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It sounds fascinating, I can’t even imagine living that life for even a day!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Cozynookbks says:

    I’m not too big on memoirs but I’m glad you enjoyed it.
    Many years ago I went to a museum in Chicago I believe that had a coal mine exhibit. It was FASCINATING. This post made me recollect that great experience.

    Liked by 1 person

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