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A Dream Called Home–search for happiness

A Dream Called Home

by Reyna Grande

Torn between two countries, immigrant Reyna Grande seeks to find herself. Is she Mexican or American? Will she ever fit into either culture? Is she destined to metaphorically straddle the border for a lifetime? When her first book was published in 2006, one of her dreams had come true and she had begun “a lifelong quest to advocate for the Mexican immigrant community by sharing our stories with the world.” What she found in the aftermath of its publication, however, is that her story resonates with other immigrant communities as well and even with Native Americans who feel the same struggles to maintain a dual identity, language, and culture.

Reyna’s difficult, abusive childhood is discussed at various points in her memoir A Dream Called Home as it plays a strong and recurrent role in her efforts to work through the emotions of her turbulent past through her writing. She makes mistakes along the way as a college student and as a young adult, but she learns from them and decides to experience them as a part of the growth that shaped her into “a unique individual with a unique voice.”

The memoir is filled with stories of her personal relationships. She realizes that she is subconsciously seeking out the love of her father that she never felt under his roof or when he left his family in poverty to earn money in the United States. Reyna and her siblings wrestle with so many decisions in the U.S., and Reyna has to accept that the pathway to healing and success for her is not the right one for them. Fortunately, she has Chicana professors that become lifelong mentors. Even though Reyna is a talented writer, she also has to learn the difficult business end of publication.

Her stint as an untrained middle school teacher in Los Angeles is both sad and predictable for those familiar with teaching in that climate. She experiences unsupportive parents, disrespectful students, and ever changing assignments and curriculum. A bright light for Reyna is her introduction to folklórico. It revives her own interest in her Mexican heritage and renews an enthusiasm in Mexican culture for her students, many of whom, like Reyna, feel displaced and unsettled.
Reyna’s story can not be summarized in a review. My job is to tell you that A Dream Called Home is a book you should read; it should be a part of your mental catalogue. Regardless of your position on the influx of immigrants currently overwhelming the U.S. and its broken political system, you will find Reyna Grande’s perspective both informative and enlightening if you want to understand the struggles of people desperate to emerge from poverty who are clinging to the hope of the American dream.

Rating: 5/5

Category: Memoir

Notes: Includes pictures that personalize Grande and her experiences

Publication: 2018—Atria

Memorable Lines:

My biggest virtue and my biggest flaw was the tenacity with which I clung to my dreams, no matter how futile they might seem to others. The dream of having a true relationship with my parents was the one I had clung to the most because it was the first dream I’d had, and the farthest from my reach.

“Being in a new country, learning a new language, a new culture, takes time. You will learn. It doesn’t feel that way now, but one day you will be just as comfortable speaking English as you are speaking Spanish. But no matter what, don’t ever forget where you came from, and don’t ever be ashamed of who you are.”

I was finally beginning to understand that it takes as much courage to leave as it does to stay, and that being a parent was way more complicated than I had ever imagined.

Fortitude—Resilience in the Age of Outrage

Fortitude—Resilience in the Age of Outrage

by Dan Crenshaw

Fortitude is a nonfiction work that holds Dan Crenshaw’s views on strength of character and how people who have fortitude can work together for a better America. Crenshaw is a member of the House of Representatives and a former Navy SEAL. Therefore, Fortitude is colored by his time in D.C. as well as his experiences in the military.  It is, however, an inspirational book, not a political diatribe. Crenshaw references history, philosophy, psychology, SEAL training, and his personal story to explain the different components of character building as well as the deficits and issues prominent in our current society.

Crenshaw pulls the curtain back on the popular outrage displayed by both conservatives and liberals as many spew epithets without evidence to back up their position of hatred. “If you find yourself calling someone a racist, communist, traitor, RINO, or Nazi because they disagree with you, it is a good indication that your arguments are shallow and your emotions are driving your thinking.”

One of my biggest personal take-aways from this book is the importance of how I frame my own story, my personal narrative. Crenshaw explains how changing “I have to” to “I get to” is empowering, lets you take back control of your life, and removes you from the victim status.

He also speaks to suffering and hard times. Both can help you develop a strong character and confidence. Meeting challenges can actually push you to a higher level of functioning both physically and psychologically. If you voluntarily submit yourself to hardship, you are also building resilience that will help sustain you when you find yourself in trying times not of your choosing. 

A review can not begin to cover all aspects of Fortitude. Read it to be exposed to Crenshaw’s background and experiences. Reread it to incorporate some of his philosophies, beliefs, and insights into your own frame of reference.

I would like to extend my thanks to NetGalley and to Twelve (Hachette Book Group) for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 4/5

Category: Politics, Inspiration

Notes: Contains foul language and is appropriate for adults, not children

Publication:   April 7, 2020—Twelve (Hachette Book Group)

Memorable Lines:

…a culture characterized by grit, discipline, and self-reliance is a culture that survives. A culture characterized by self-pity, indulgence, outrage, and resentment is a culture that falls apart.

Life is a power struggle, and the heroes we value are no longer those who gracefully overcome adversity, but those who complain the loudest about their story of injustice.

Unfortunately, these days, too many people are overcoming their knowledge deficits with passion, and too many more people are mistaking “passion” and “authenticity” for righteousness and sophistication. It is an unhealthy trend.

Happy 4th of July!

Whether you call it Old Glory, the Stars and Stripes, or the Red, White, and Blue, our flag represents the United States of America. The Declaration of Independence, our founding document, was signed on July 4, 1776.

Here are some patriotic displays I saw this week walking around a subdivision in Oklahoma.

Memorial Day

Memorial Day in the United States is observed on the last Monday in May and honors those in the U.S. military who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for our protection and freedom. In my mind it also honors the families who have lost their loved ones to that cause. Their lives will never be the same.

As I walked around our home in the mountains this weekend, I saw inspiring red, white, and blues in nature and am sharing them in honor of those heroes. Some of the reds have an orangish glow on the camera and the blues tend more toward purple, but we’ll use our imaginations and call it creative license.

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